Lockout Tagout (LOTO) - Knowledge Center

Welcome to the Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Knowledge Center. Why do you need to be concerned about LOTO? Employees can be seriously or fatally injured if machinery they service or maintain unexpectedly energizes, starts up, or releases stored energy. OSHA's standard on the Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout), found in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910.147, spells out the steps employers must take to prevent accidents associated with hazardous energy. Practicing LOTO not only provides workers with protection from industrial machinery, but also protects your company from extensive OSHA fines that can be detrimental to company reputation and finances.

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Properly Controlling Hazardous Energy with Correct LOTO TrainingWhy do I need to be concerned about Lockout Tagout (LOTO)? Employees can be seriously or fatally injured if machinery they service or maintain unexpectedly energizes, starts (more...)

What’s in, what’s out, what’s new, and what’s neededIn 1993 OSHA enacted 29 CFR 1910.146 “Permit-Required Confined Spaces.” In 2015, a major new confined space regulation, 1926 Subpart AA, expanded (more...)

Lockout Tagout (LOTO) Terms

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What is a hazardous atmosphere?


According to OSHA, a “hazardous atmosphere” is an atmosphere that may expose employees to the risk of death, incapacitation, impairment of ability to self-rescue, injury...

What is oxygen deficiency?


Fresh air contains approximately 20.9% oxygen (O2). According to OSHA, atmosphere that contains less than 19.5% by volume is hazardous due to oxygen deficiency. As the...

What is a confined space?


According to 29 CFR 1910.146, a confined space is characterized by the simultaneous existence of three conditions:It must be large enough and so configured that it is...